Observatory Systems and Operations

Tradespace investigation of strategic design factors for large space telescopes

[+] Author Affiliations
Brandon Karlow

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States

Draper Laboratory, 555 Technology Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States

Christopher Jewison, David Sternberg, Sherrie Hall

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States

Alessandro Golkar

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States

Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, 100 Novaya Ulitsa, Skolkovo, Odintsovski District, Moscow Region 143025, Russia

J. Astron. Telesc. Instrum. Syst. 1(2), 027003 (Apr 30, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JATIS.1.2.027003
History: Received July 25, 2014; Accepted March 30, 2015
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Abstract.  Future large telescope arrays require careful balancing of satisfaction across the stakeholders’ community. Development programs usually cannot afford to explicitly address all stakeholder tradeoffs during the conceptual design stage, but rather confine the analysis to performance, cost, and schedule discussions, treating policy and budget as constraints defining the envelope of the investigation. Thus, it is of interest to develop an integrated stakeholder analysis approach to explicitly address the impact of all stakeholder interactions on the design of large telescope arrays to address future science and exploration needs. This paper offers a quantitative approach for modeling some of the stakeholder influences relevant to large telescope array designs—the linkages between a given mission and the wider NASA community. The main goal of the analysis is to explore the tradespace of large telescope designs and understand the effects of different design decisions in the stakeholders’ network. Proposed architectures that offer benefits to existing constellations of systems, institutions, and mission plans are expected to yield political and engineering benefits for NASA stakeholders’ wider objectives. If such synergistic architectures are privileged in subsequent analysis, regions of the tradespace that better meet the needs of the wider NASA community can be selected for further development.

© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Brandon Karlow ; Christopher Jewison ; David Sternberg ; Sherrie Hall and Alessandro Golkar
"Tradespace investigation of strategic design factors for large space telescopes", J. Astron. Telesc. Instrum. Syst. 1(2), 027003 (Apr 30, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JATIS.1.2.027003


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