Ground and Space-Based Telescopes

First exoplanet transit observation with the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy: confirmation of Rayleigh scattering in HD 189733 b with the High-Speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations

[+] Author Affiliations
Daniel Angerhausen

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771, United States

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, New York 12180, United States

Georgi Mandushev, Edward Dunham, Peter Collins

Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001, United States

Avi Mandell, Michael McElwain

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771, United States

Eric Becklin

University of California Los Angeles, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 465 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095, United States

USRA-SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035, United States

Ryan Hamilton, Maureen Savage, Sachindev Shenoy, William Vacca, Jeff Van Cleve

USRA-SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035, United States

Sarah E. Logsdon, Ian McLean

University of California Los Angeles, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 465 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095, United States

Enrico Pfüller, Jürgen Wolf

University of Stuttgart, Deutsches SOFIA Institut, Pfaffenwaldring 29, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany

J. Astron. Telesc. Instrum. Syst. 1(3), 034002 (Jul 07, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JATIS.1.3.034002
History: Received January 6, 2015; Accepted June 8, 2015
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Abstract.  Here, we report on the first successful exoplanet transit observation with the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). We observed a single transit of the hot Jupiter HD 189733 b, obtaining two simultaneous primary transit lightcurves in the B and z bands as a demonstration of SOFIA’s capability to perform absolute transit photometry. We present a detailed description of our data reduction, in particular, the correlation of photometric systematics with various in-flight parameters unique to the airborne observing environment. The derived transit depths at B and z wavelengths confirm a previously reported slope in the optical transmission spectrum of HD 189733 b. Our results give new insights to the current discussion about the source of this Rayleigh scattering in the upper atmosphere and the question of fixed limb darkening coefficients in fitting routines.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Daniel Angerhausen ; Georgi Mandushev ; Avi Mandell ; Edward Dunham ; Eric Becklin, et al.
"First exoplanet transit observation with the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy: confirmation of Rayleigh scattering in HD 189733 b with the High-Speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations", J. Astron. Telesc. Instrum. Syst. 1(3), 034002 (Jul 07, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JATIS.1.3.034002


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