Special Section on a Future Large-Aperture Ultraviolet/Optical/Infrared Space Observatory

Future large-aperture UVOIR space observatory: reference designs

[+] Author Affiliations
Norman Rioux, Harley Thronson, Lee Feinberg, Andrew Jones, James Sturm, Christine Collins, Alice Liu, Matthew Bolcar

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771, United States

H. Phillip Stahl

NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35811, United States

Dave Redding

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109, United States

J. Astron. Telesc. Instrum. Syst. 2(4), 041214 (Sep 15, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JATIS.2.4.041214
History: Received February 26, 2016; Accepted August 22, 2016
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Abstract.  Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC and STScI study team has used community-developed science goals to derive mission needs, design parameters, notional instruments, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, noncryogenic UVOIR space observatory. We describe the feasibility assessment of system dynamic stability that supports coronagraphy. The observatory is in a Sun–Earth L2 orbit, which provides a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Reference designs include a 36-segment 9.2-m aperture telescope that stows within a 5-m diameter launch vehicle fairing. This paper presents results from the latest cycle of integrated modeling through January 2016. The latest findings support the feasibility of secondary mirror support struts with a thickness on the order of an inch. Thin struts were found not to have a significant negative effect on wavefront error stability. Struts with a width as small as 1 in. may benefit some coronagraph designs by allowing more optical throughput.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Norman Rioux ; Harley Thronson ; Lee Feinberg ; H. Phillip Stahl ; Dave Redding, et al.
"Future large-aperture UVOIR space observatory: reference designs", J. Astron. Telesc. Instrum. Syst. 2(4), 041214 (Sep 15, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JATIS.2.4.041214


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